Notes From the Northern Colony

thenational

by Greum Maol Stevenson

Not all websites track you. This one does not, and neither does Gerry Hassan's. But here are some that do (information found using Blacklight):

The National has 29 ad trackers, more than four times the average of seven found on popular sites. It also has 12 third-party cookies, four times the average of three. On the bright side, it has no Google Analytics.

The Herald, owned by the same company as The National, is worse, with 35 ad trackers and 14 third-party cookies.

The Scotsman is worse than both of the above combined, with 41 ad trackers and 75 third-party cookies.

Scotland on Sunday, owned by the same company as The Scotsman, has 33 ad trackers and 59 third-party cookies.

Glasgow Live has 34 ad trackers, 66 third-party cookies, and allows Google Analytics to follow you across the internet.

The Ferret has seven ad trackers, three third-party cookies, and allows Google Analytics to follow you across the internet.

Bella Caledonia has one ad tracker. But it allows Google Analytics to follow you across the internet.

Craig Murray's site has one ad tracker and eight third-party cookies.

Wings Over Scotland, aka The Daily McMail, has one ad tracker and three third-party cookies.

Common Weal has one ad tracker.

The Scottish Book Trust's site has four ad trackers, could be monitoring your keystrokes and mouse clicks, allows Google Analytics to follow you across the internet, and tells Facebook when you visit the site (though if you use Facebook this is the least of your worries).

#scottishwebsites, #theherald #thenational #thescotsman #scotlandonsunday, #craigmurray #gerryhassan #theferret #scottishbooktrust #commonweal #bellacaledonia #scottishpolitics #surveillancecapitalism #blacklight #scottishblogs #greummaolstevenson

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by Greum Maol Stevenson

Last year, I remarked to a friend that he has what I consider a sexist habit of referring to female politicians by their first names, but uses last names for their male counterparts. He refers to the Scottish First Minister as “Nicola,” but never referred to her predecessor as “Alex.” I told him I thought this showed he took women less seriously than men, seeing them as closer to children than adults.

He replied he always referred to Boris Johnson by his first name, but admitted he did not do that with any other male politicians. I suggested this supported my point, because Johnson's clownish persona made my friend see him as an overgrown child, giving him the same status he gave women.

And it is a persona; in private life, he is not called Boris. His friends and family call him Al, his actual first name (his name is Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson). In a similar way to the US cult of “Bernie” — Sanders's friends and family call him Bernard — Johnson is selling performance, not policy. But, unlike Sanders, he is dangerous.

In this ungrammatical column in The National, Lesley Riddoch does a good job of normalising him by referring to him with chummy, faux-familiarity.

It is of urgent importance not to trivialise this catastrophe with cute nicknames. Call him what he is: the Prime Minister. And in calling him that, consider the ultra-right-wing populist who now holds that office, and see where we are.

#borisjohnson #nicolasturgeon #populism #lesleyriddoch #scottishpolitics #thenational #scotland #scottishblogs #greummaolstevenson

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